Original Research

The use of continuous household surveys to generate timely data for annual programme outcome monitoring: Experience from the Integrated Family Health Program in Ethiopia

Girma Kassie, Mengistu A. Kibret, Bekele B. Tefera, Kidest L. Hagos, Habtamu Zerihun, Ismael Ali
African Evaluation Journal | Vol 6, No 1 | a252 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/aej.v6i1.252 | © 2018 Girma Kassie, Mengistu A. Kibret, Bekele B. Tefera, Kidest L. Hagos, Habtamu Zerihun, Ismael Ali | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 17 July 2017 | Published: 28 March 2018

About the author(s)

Girma Kassie, Integrated Family Health Program, Pathfinder International, Ethiopia
Mengistu A. Kibret, Integrated Family Health Program, Pathfinder International, Ethiopia
Bekele B. Tefera, Integrated Family Health Program, Pathfinder International, Ethiopia
Kidest L. Hagos, Integrated Family Health Program, Pathfinder International, Ethiopia
Habtamu Zerihun, Integrated Family Health Program, Pathfinder International, Ethiopia
Ismael Ali, John Snow, Inc., Addis Ababa, Ethiopia


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: Lack of timely household (HH) level data to inform evidence-based decision-making for improved, timely and targeted health interventions is challenging. Integrated Family Health Program (IFHP) developed and implemented a system for collecting data on an on-going basis at household levels.
Objective: To discuss the implementation of the continuous household surveys of the IFHP.
Methods: Continuous surveys were used for generating timely data for monitoring outcome indicators. Integrated Family Health Program conducted continuous cross-sectional household surveys in its four major target regions over the past 6 years. This approach facilitated the aggregation of data annually, thus enabling progress to be tracked over time and timely decision-making. A total of 2560 households were interviewed each year and trend report synthesised for use.
Result: Key performance indicators in the areas of family planning, and maternal and child health were considered for the study. Time series analysis data revealed overall progress in each outcome indicator. The report was shared among key programme staff to provide data for informed programmatic decision-making.
Conclusion: The surveys as part of other programme activities proved to be a feasible and efficient way to generate timely data for programme outcome monitoring. Documenting the design and implementing data collection and feedback mechanism for prospective description and outcome monitoring potentially represents a new paradigm for course correction.
Recommendation: Programme implementers should plan integrated continuous programme outcome monitoring mechanism as part of programme design rather than waiting for mid-term or end-term project evaluation.

Keywords

Survey; Timely data; Time series analysis

Metrics

Total abstract views: 289
Total article views: 229


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.