Original Research - Special Collection: Made in Africa

Decolonising and indigenising evaluation practice in Africa: Roadmap for mainstreaming the Made in Africa Evaluation approach

Ayabulela Dlakavu, Jabulani Mathebula, Samukelisiwe Mkhize
African Evaluation Journal | Vol 10, No 1 | a620 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/aej.v10i1.620 | © 2022 Ayabulela Dlakavu, Jabulani Mathebula, Samukelisiwe Mkhize | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 15 February 2022 | Published: 22 August 2022

About the author(s)

Ayabulela Dlakavu, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results – Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; and, Department of Politics and International Relations, Faculty of Humanities, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Jabulani Mathebula, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results – Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; and, South African Monitoring and Evaluation Association, Johannesburg, South Africa; and, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Samukelisiwe Mkhize, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results – Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; and, World Food Programme, Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Decolonisation is a concept that has taken on multiple layers since the end of colonisation and the onset of independence in the Global South. More than ever before, decolonialism, decoloniality and indigenisation have moved to the centre of intellectual inquiry across the broad spectrum of human activity: knowledge production, education, academic disciplines, professions, political life and economic organisation. The evaluation profession and fraternity has also been grappling with the idea of decolonising and indigenising its ontological, epistemological and methodological foundations, which are essentially rooted in the Global North development theory, practice and knowledge systems.

Objectives: This article endeavours to provide recommendations on how to make the Made in Africa Evaluation (MAE) paradigm practical (applicable) for evaluators in Africa, based on decolonisation and indigenisation methodological prescriptions.

Method: The study is qualitative by design, employing document analysis and the authors’ observation on development and evaluation practice in Africa and globally.

Results: The emergent practice of evaluation is only experiencing decolonial scrutiny in the 21st century. In the African context, the MAE paradigm appears to be the continent’s decolonisation and indigenisation project for the evaluation fraternity.

Conclusion: Building an Afrocentric, decolonised and indigenous MAE paradigm and approach requires a coordinated effort on building scholarship on the topic of MAE approaches and methodologies. Once there is sufficient documentation of the MAE approach, it should become easier to advance Afrocentric evaluation as mainstream discourse alongside the more established and neoliberal development and evaluation discourse.


Keywords

decolonisation; decoloniality; development; evaluation; Made in Africa Evaluation (MAE); philosophy; ontology; epistemology; methodology

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Crossref Citations

1. Made in Africa Evaluation
Mark Abrahams, Steven Masvaure, Candice Morkel
African Evaluation Journal  vol: 10  issue: 1  year: 2022  
doi: 10.4102/aej.v10i1.665