Original Research

A stakeholder view of the development of national evaluation systems in Africa

Takunda Chirau, Caitlin Blaser Mapitsa, Matodzi Amisi, Banele Masilela, Ayabulela Dlakavu
African Evaluation Journal | Vol 8, No 1 | a504 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/aej.v8i1.504 | © 2020 Takunda Chirau, Caitlin Blaser Mapitsa, Matodzi Amisi, Banele Masilela, Ayabulela Dlakavu | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 27 June 2020 | Published: 30 November 2020

About the author(s)

Takunda Chirau, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Caitlin Blaser Mapitsa, School of Governance, Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Matodzi Amisi, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Banele Masilela, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Ayabulela Dlakavu, Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results Anglophone Africa (CLEAR-AA), Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

vidence for policy-informed decision-making, budgeting and programming. National evaluation systems (NESs) are being set up across Africa, together with the processes and other monitoring and evaluation (M&E) infrastructure for efficient and effective functioning.

Objectives: This article seeks to document comparative developments in the growth of systems in Anglophone African countries, and provide an understanding of these systems for capacity-development interventions in these countries. It also aims to contribute to the public debate on the development of national M&E systems, institutionalisation of evaluation, and use of M&E evidence in the larger African context.

Methods: This article uses four key dimensions as the conceptual framework of a national monitoring and evaluation system, including monitoring and evaluation systems in the executive; the functioning of parliamentary M&E systems; professionalisation of evaluation and existence of an enabling environment. A questionnaire was used to collect information based on the key dimensions from government and non-governmental personnel. The Mo Ibrahim index of 2018 was used to collect information on enabling environment.

Results: Findings indicate that all systems have stakeholders with different roles and contexts and are designed according to the state architecture, prevailing resources and capacities.

Conclusions: This article concludes that the findings can be used as different entry points for developing and strengthening M&E capacities in countries studied.


Keywords

Africa; evaluation systems; evidence informed policy making; monitoring and evaluation; national evaluations systems; evaluation stakeholders

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